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Sleep to Dreaming

The human body needs sleep in order to function properly. Sleep is involved in the healing and repair of the body, and helps to keep the immune system functioning properly. Without enough sleep, the body cannot repair itself effectively, and this can lead to a variety of health problems.

Sleep is important for physical renewal of the body’s cells. When we sleep, our body is able to flush out toxins and bi-products that can build up and cause inflammation. This inflammation can lead to a variety of autoimmune diseases.

In order to maintain good health, it is important to get seven to nine hours of sleep every night. Anything less than this can lead to a decrease in physical and mental function, and can even contribute to the progression of serious diseases. Let's review where you are.




 

SLEEPING SWEET DREAMS

Despite the importance of sleep to good health, many adults and children do not meet the recommended guidelines.


There are a number of negative effects of sleep deprivation on the body, including memory loss, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, irritability, feeling drowsy, deterioration of neurons, deterioration of connections between neurons, impaired immune system, heart rate variability, impaired cell growth, repair, and renewal, hampered physical performance.


Why is sleep so important?

  • Regulates the immune system and tissue repair

  • Reduces pain - longer/better quality sleep increases pain tolerance

  • Decreases cravings and regulates hunger

  • Regulates hormones and insulin sensitivity

  • Increases resistance to stress

  • Regulates neurotransmitters

Adults are recommended to sleep 7 – 9 hours. Those with autoimmune may need to sleep 12 hours or more.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the following guidelines:
AgeAmount of Sleep1 – 2 years11 – 14 hours (including naps)3 – 5 years10 – 13 hours (including naps)6 – 12 years9 – 12 hours13 – 18 years8 – 10 hours
“The American Academy of Pediatrics found that adequate sleep duration for age on a regular basis leads to improved attention, behavior, learning, memory, emotional regulation, quality of life, and mental and physical health. Not getting enough sleep each night is associated with an increase in injuries, hypertension, obesity and depression.” (1)

TIPS FOR IMPROVED SLEEP HYGIENE

Introduce a regular and calming bedtime routine (bath, lights down, read a book).


Spend time with Abide Meditation with Prayer or night tine meditation.

Keep the temperature around 68F or 20C. Blackout blinds or an eye mask can help with lights that may filter into the room. A comfortable bed and clean bedding helps improve sleep. Keep technology out of the bedroom. Stick to a regular bed and wake time to set a rhythm.

Remove any feelings of anxiety from the room.

Identify with your safe surroundings.



Nutrition can also influence the quality of sleep.


  • Starchy carbs at night will help tryptophan enter the pineal gland, where it helps with melatonin production for better sleep. So, a little starch with dinner is a good thing! AIP starches include root vegetables

  • Itis starches include root vegetables plus gluten free grains like rice and oats. Avoid caffeine and chocolate in the afternoon/evening. It impacts cortisol (stress hormone) and it can stay elevated for up to 6 hours.

  • Night waking (2 to 4 a.m.) can indicate blood sugar imbalances. Work on balancing blood sugar at each meal (protein + fat + fibre) and avoid higher-glycemic items (refined sugar, cereals). A protein rich or fat rich snack before bed can help.

  • If you wake at night to use the bathroom, pay attention to the amount of water you’re drinking and when. Spreading water out throughout the day will help improve hydration and reduce mid-night waking to tinkle. Undiagnosed food allergies and sensitivities can contribute to disturbances. For kids, dairy is a common food trigger for bedwetting.

Foods higher in melatonin that can be helpful at dinner time:

  • Fish, making fish a super food for dinner time

  • Tart cherries - add those to salads and mix in with vegetables

  • Mushrooms

  • Bananas

  • Nuts

  • Rice

  • Oats


Sleep And Lifestyle

  • Getting outside in the morning can help you sleep better at night. It triggers a hormonal cascade that helps you sleep better later in the night.

  • Walking is beneficial to good night's sleep

  • Gentle exercise can also enhance the quality of sleep.

  • Blue light from electronics and television can disrupt sleep patterns; experts recommend avoiding technology for 1-2 hours before bedtime. A pair of blue-light-blocking glasses can be helpful in reducing stimulus to the eye as can the F.Lux app which you can download to your computer or phone.

  • Napping is a good thing.

  • Identify the stressors

  • Review habits and desires to best sleep.

  • Detect patterns that should be eliminated.

  • Write down your night schedule to optimal sleep.



 

SLEEP ASSESSMENT QUIZ

Y/NQuality of Sleep

  • Do you get the recommended amount of sleep each night?

  • Do you take naps everyday?

  • Do you experience night-waking (bathroom, pain, other)

  • Do you snore (or told you snore)?

  • Do you wake feeling tired and unrested?

TOTAL

If you answered Y to any, there is an opportunity to improve sleep.

Y/NSleep Hygiene

  • Is your bedroom above 68 F or 20C when you sleep?

  • Is there technology in your bedroom (television, cell phones, computer, other)?

  • Is your bed uncomfortable or crowded?

  • Do you have a difficult time washing and changing your bed sheets once a week?

  • Do you have a lot of exterior light that floods the bedroom at night time, or sleep with a light on (hallway lights, city lights, other)?

  • Do you keep irregular bedtime hours (i.e. 10 pm one night and 1pm the next?

  • Do you struggle with a consistent bedtime routine that calms you down for at least 1 hour before bed (i.e, bath, lights down low, music, time to decompress)?

TOTAL

If you answered Y to any one of these, that is something you can work on to improve your ability to go to sleep and quality of sleep.

Y/NDiet

  • Do you eat refined starchy carbohydrates throughout the day (i.e, breads, crackers, potatoes, rice, pasta, pastries, cereals, cookies, other baked goods)?

  • Do you eat refined sugar or products (i.e., candies, sweets, treats)?

  • Do you try to avoid or naturally avoid certain food groups – animal meat, healthy fats or starchy carbohydrates?

  • Is your diet lacking quality protein (at least twice a day) and healthy fats (at least twice a day)? Do you drink more than 1 cup of coffee a day and/or eat chocolate on a regular basis?

  • Do you have suspected food sensitivities (gas, bloating, heartburn, rash, headaches)?

TOTAL

If you answered Y to more than one of these, diet may be impacting your quality of sleep.

Y/NGeneral Lifestyle

  • Do you struggle to get the recommended time of at least 15 minutes outdoors in the morning, on a daily basis to help set the circadian rhythm?

  • Do you struggle to complete at least 30 minutes of GENTLE exercise on a daily basis?

  • Do you watch television, phone, or computer in the hours before bedtime?

  • Do you wake up throughout the night with a recurring thought or action?

  • Do you know something you ate avoiding like completing your taxes?

TOTAL

If you answered Y to any of these questions, this is an area to work on.


 

Sleep is important for health because it allows the body to repair cells and recharge energy levels. A wind-down routine before bed can help prepare the body for sleep and make it easier to fall asleep.

To create a wind-down routine, start by disconnecting from electronics screens at least 30 minutes before bedtime. Then, do something calming, such as reading or taking a bath. Finally, establish a regular sleep schedule by going to bed and waking up at the same time each day. By following these steps, you can create a routine that will help you get the sleep you need to feel your best. sleep is important for health because it allows the body to repair cells and recharge energy levels. A wind-down routine before bed can help prepare the body for sleep and make it easier to fall asleep.

To create a wind-down routine, start by disconnecting from electronics screens at least 30 minutes before bedtime. Then, do something calming, such as reading or taking a bath. Finally, establish a regular sleep schedule by going to bed and waking up at the same time each day. By following these steps, you can create a routine that will help you get the sleep you need to feel your best. sleep is important for health because it allows the body to repair cells and recharge energy levels. A wind-down routine before bed can help prepare the body for sleep and make it easier to fall asleep.

 

Sample Routine:


Consistency is all you need, your body likes routines and soon it will recognize this pattern as a signal that it is time to sleep. Don't let the timing in the sample routines intimidate you, but give yourself time Prepare for sleep at least 30 minutes in advance. It's okay to change the routine to fit your need. We are not seeking perfection we are seeking what works for you and that is what drives the JOY here. We have no rights or wrongs only attempts to grow and move forward.


No matter what you're doing, turn off bright lights two hours before bed.

If your current routine includes watching TV or being on the computer/phone, make gradual changes to get off electronics a couple hours before bed.


General Tips

Routine 1 (60 minutes)

  • 9:00pm: 20 minutes meditation breathwork

  • 9:20pm: Journal for 10 minutes

  • 9:30pm: Take a bath

  • 9:50pm: Put on pajamas, brush teeth, etc.

  • 9:55pm: Listen to guided relaxation

  • 10:00pm: Close blinds, turn on sound machine, go to sleep


Routine 2 (30 minutes)

  • 9:30pm: Start to wind down; have a cup of herbal tea and journal for 15-20 minutes.

  • 9:50pm: Put on pajamas, brush teeth, etc.

  • 9:55pm: 5 minutes of deep, relaxing breathing / calming integrative breathwork

  • 10:00pm: Put on eye mask, go to sleep


Routine 3 (15 minutes)

  • 9:45: Turn down bright lights, put on pajamas, brush teeth, etc.

  • 9:50: Journal for 5 minutes as a "brain dump" to get any thoughts or worries out of your head

  • 9:55: Five-minute guided meditation OR 5-minutes of integrative breathwork

  • 10:00: Turn on sound machine, go to sleep



Share what tips you have picked up and where you found the most value. Remember sharing is caring so please share the membership with others of this is helpful you you.


Let me know in chat what changes you are making in your sleep.


Talk soon!

Julie


This is me and my late dog Yoda. Actually he was Zacharys dog I was just the one he woke up with. Get good sleep, Be diligent. Change your habits. Change your life!




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